From 1 - 10 / 22
  • Predicted distribution of biotopes using data from SEA surveys from 2003 & 2006 together with BGS data.

  • In 1993, the MNCR initiated a survey of lagoons in Scotland. Seventy-two lagoons in the Outer Hebrides were studied as part of this programme. This included field surveys of the shores (if tidal) and subtidal zone of each lagoon to describe the biotopes. Comparable data from other organisations have been added and the data analysed to classify the biotopes present. The information available for MNCR Sector 14 is presented as 72 area summaries.

  • The sealochs of the Outer Hebrides (MNCR Sector 14) have been studied as part of the Marine Nature Conservation Review programme. This included field surveys of the shores and nearshore subtidal zone to describe the biotopes. Comparable data from other organisations have been added to provide information on over 400 sites within the region and analysed to classify the biotopes present. The information available for MNCR Sector 14 is presented as 26 area summaries.

  • The kelp beds and interspersed sandy bays around Sanday were intensively surveyed using an acoustic ground discrimination system for remote survey and a towed video for ground truth sampling. The data were analysed using image classification techniques to produce a map showing the distribution of the kelp life forms and sand habitats. Phase 2 diver records were used, together with the video records, to describe the biotopes in detail. The kelp biotopes were typical of those described in the UK National Marine Biotope Classification (Connor et al. 1997). The report will inform site managers (including non-marine officers in Scottish Natural Heritage) of the biological importance of the kelp beds.

  • This evaluation of the RoxAnn system as a tool for mapping the distribution of kelp biotopes has been undertaken as part of the BioMar Project which is funded by the European Community through the LIFE Programme. The central aim of the present project was to evaluate of the RoxAnn system as a tool for mapping the distribution of kelp on the north west coast of the Isle of Lewis. If the RoxAnn system could map the distribution of kelp biotopes, it could prove to be a valuable tool for gathering resource data to assist management decisions - for instance assessing kelp harvesting proposals. The BioMar team carried out the field work for this study from August 27 to September 2, 1994. Five areas were studied on the NW coast of Lewis, Western Isles: four areas within East Loch Roag and the open coast from East Loch Roag to Bragar. Biological data were collected for 59 remote video samples, and the change in kelp density with depth measured at ten sites using SCUBA diving.

  • This project attempts to map the broadscale biotopes and habitats of the rocky reef sites west of the Outer Hebrides through integrating multibeam echosounder data, acoustic ground discrimination system (AGDS) data, underwater video/camera surveys and grab data, facilitated through the use of GIS. Where possible, biotopes have been resolved and classified using the National Marine Habitat Classification for Britain and Ireland (Connor et al., 2004).

  • The Loch of Stenness is the largest saline lagoon in the UK and has been proposed as a cSAC. SeaMap were contracted to carry out a comprehensive survey and mapping exercise of the subtidal and intertidal habitats and associated biota of the loch in its entirety and that part of the Loch of Harray where this was found to have any brackish water. The survey was carried out using AGDS and direct observation using a towed video system and grab samples. Salinity was also measured.

  • The study ?Trialing of AGDS and video sledge monitoring techniques in Loch Maddy? is part of a larger project ?Loch Maddy monitoring trials? which itself contributes to Task 2.1 of the UK marine SACs LIFE project. This aims to establish an appropriate programme of surveillance and monitoring for the Special Areas for Conservation (SAC) and to trial monitoring methodologies and protocols for the features of a site. The Loch Maddy project will assist in the development of best practise for future monitoring and reporting programmes for other marine SACs in the UK and Europe. The first phase (1998-9) concentrates on testing variability within methodologies and the determination of the minimum intensity of sampling necessary to provide adequate data for monitoring. The second phase (1999-2000) will concentrate on repeatability However, the major part of the 1998-9 study, which concentrates on the use of acoustic ground discrimination systems (AGDS) for biotope mapping, will make use of previous mapping studies undertaken in 1996 and will provide valuable guidance for future studies on repeatability of mapping.

  • This evaluation of the RoxAnn system as a tool for mapping the distribution of kelp biotopes has been undertaken as part of the BioMar Project which is funded by the European Community through the LIFE Programme. The central aim of the present project was to evaluate of the RoxAnn system as a tool for mapping the distribution of kelp on the north west coast of the Isle of Lewis. If the RoxAnn system could map the distribution of kelp biotopes, it could prove to be a valuable tool for gathering resource data to assist management decisions - for instance assessing kelp harvesting proposals. The BioMar team carried out the field work for this study from August 27 to September 2, 1994. Five areas were studied on the NW coast of Lewis, Western Isles: four areas within East Loch Roag and the open coast from East Loch Roag to Bragar. Biological data were collected for 59 remote video samples, and the change in kelp density with depth measured at ten sites using SCUBA diving.