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Environment

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  • Mapping of the Vatika Bay seafloor has been conducted in two different periods: in June 2010 and May 2015. The shallow, northern part of the Bay has been mapped in 2010 during the research project "PAVLOPETRI" by means of swath bathymetry (RESON SeaBat 7125 200/400 kHz), side scan sonar (Geoacoustics 100/400 kHz) and pinger (3.5 kHz) subbottom profiler. The deeper seafloor of the Bay has been surveyed in 2015 by means of side scan sonar and chirp subbottom profiling for the purposes of the research project "Environmental Study of Vatika Bay", funded by the Prefecture of Peloponnese. The research vessel "ALKYON" has been used in both cruises. The description of the nature of the seafloor and the habitat mapping has been based mostly on the interpretation of the acoustic-geophysical data and Sentinel-2 satellite imagery, as well as secondarily on the limited sampling performed in the area.

  • JNCC and Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) undertook aseabed survey (CEND 22/13 & 23/13) at the North Norfolk Sandbanks and Saturn Reef SCIbetween 4 November and 25 November 2013 on the RV Cefas Endeavour(Vanstaen and Whomersley 2014). The aim was to gather additional seabed data to assist with the development of management advice for the site. Locations of known S. spinulosa reef, along with historic records where reef had been previously observed, were surveyed to assess presence, and where possible, delineate the Annex I biogenic reef feature and characterise associated fauna.

  • Carbonate sand deposits are modelled for the Trondelag coast of Norway (Bekkby et al. 2013). The model was carried out in the projection UTM zone 33N. Carbonate sand deposits were defined as having at least 50 % carbonate content. The model was developed based on 1105 data points and GAM analyses of presence and absence points. Data were collected 2007-2008 by the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU), the model was run in 2009 by NIVA. The distribution model is based on depth, wave exposure and maximum current speed, depth being the most important variable (see Bekkby et al. 2009 for explanation of the GIS environmental layers). The input depth and wave exposure models had a spatial (horizontal) distribution of 25 m, the current speed model was resampled from 500 m resolution. The output model has a spatial (horizontal) distribution of 25 m. The work was part of the National program for mapping biodiversity – coast, a program that is funded by the Ministry of Climate and Environment and the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries. The Norwegian Environment Agency is leading the project and NIVA is the scientific coordinator.

  • This file shows the distribution of Annex 1 habitats - mudflats and sandflats not covered by sea water at low tide and estuaries - in Dundalk Bay SAC. Habitat mapping is used to help define the area and range parameters for conservation objectives. Site-specific conservation objectives aim to define favourable conservation condition for Habitats Directive Annex I habitats at a site level.

  • Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) surveys were comissioned in 2005/06 by the Department of Trade & Industry (now Department for Energy and Climate Change). These surveys, in which JNCC collaborated, acquired multibeam and sidescan sonar data. Ground-truthing data (seabed imagery and biological/sediment samples) was also collected. Although full coverage multibeam and sidescan data was not present for all locations where potential Annex I reef was indicated the available data has provided a good indication of the nature of Annex I reef habitat present within Pobie Bank Reef SAC.Data from the SEA surveys were subsequently analysed to idenitfy areas of Annex I Reef within the Pobie Bank Reef SAC.

  • Region: The county Hordaland Number of field observations: 637 Field sampling year: 2004, 2005,2009, 2010 Prevalence: 34% Presence / absences: 215/422 Method: BRT run with the R-package Dismo. Number of predictor variables: 23 Information about the predictor variables: DEM (25 m resolution), slope, aspect, curvature at detailed, medium and coarse resolution (i.e. applying a 125, 525 and 1025 m moving calculating window respectively, based on the 25 m resolution DEM); wave exposure, latitude, longitude, and optimal radiation index, all with 25 m resolution; and maximum surface and seafloor current speed, slope of maximum surface and seafloor current speed, minimum surface and seafloor current speed, standard deviation of seafloor current speed, 10 and 90th percentile of surface and seafloor current speed, all current speed predictor variables with 200 m resolution, but resampled to 25 m. AUC independent data: 0.88

  • The description and mapping of marine habitat types according to Annex I of Directive 92/43/EOK (EEC, 1992) and / or the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) in 66 of approximately 300 Greek NATURA 2000 network sites, were the subject of Research Work for the Ministry of Environment Planning and Public Works of Greece. This research project, under the name "Identification and description of habitat types at sites of interest for conservation", lasted from 1999 to 2002 and was carried out by the National Centre for Marine Research (NCMR, renamed as Hellenic Centre for Marine Research - HCMR since 2003) in association with the Institute of Marine Biology of Crete (IBCM, joined to HCMR since 2003), the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the Fisheries Research Institute (FRI). The recognition and imprinting of marine habitat types was based on the combined use of aerial photos of scale 1:5000 acquired during the second half of 1999 for the needs of the project, data from the scientific echo sounder Sea-Bed discrimination system "RoxAnn", phytobenthos samples and in situ observations by scuba diving and underwater cameras. Regarding the sampling, hard bottom samplings were carried out using SCUBA diving. The samples were collected on hard substrates mainly in the upper infralittoral zone (30 to 50 cm below the lowest sea level). For the study of the soft bottom habitats, oceanographic cruses were carried out with the IMBC R/V “Filia”, using a Smith McIntyre sediment sampler.

  • Natural England (NE), in partnership with Cefas and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authority (IFCA), conducted a field survey to determine the presence and extent of the biogenic reef feature within the Torbay area of the Lyme Bay and Torbay candidate Special Area of Conservation (cSAC). Surveys were undertaken on the 25th/26th September and 4th October.Ground-truthing sample locations, intended to identify the presence and extent of Mytilus edulis beds on sediment, were identified using indicative signatures from existing acoustic datasets alongside previous point data records and local knowledge. Ground-truthing techniques included the acquisition of video and still images of the seabed.

  • This file shows the distribution of the Annex 1 reefs in Slieve League SAC. Habitat mapping is used to help define the area and range parameters for conservation objectives. Site-specific conservation objectives aim to define favourable conservation condition for Habitats Directive Annex I habitats at a site level.

  • The description and mapping of marine habitat types according to Annex I of Directive 92/43/EOK (EEC, 1992) and / or the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) in 66 of approximately 300 Greek NATURA 2000 network sites, were the subject of Research Work for the Ministry of Environment Planning and Public Works of Greece. This research project, under the name "Identification and description of habitat types at sites of interest for conservation", lasted from 1999 to 2002 and was carried out by the National Centre for Marine Research (NCMR, renamed as Hellenic Centre for Marine Research - HCMR since 2003) in association with the Institute of Marine Biology of Crete (IBCM, joined to HCMR since 2003), the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the Fisheries Research Institute (FRI). The recognition and imprinting of marine habitat types was based on the combined use of aerial photos of scale 1:5000 acquired during the second half of 1999 for the needs of the project, data from the scientific echo sounder Sea-Bed discrimination system "RoxAnn", phytobenthos samples and in situ observations by scuba diving and underwater cameras. Regarding the sampling, hard bottom samplings were carried out using SCUBA diving. The samples were collected on hard substrates mainly in the upper infralittoral zone (30 to 50 cm below the lowest sea level). For the study of the soft bottom habitats, oceanographic cruses were carried out with the IMBC R/V “Filia”, using a Smith McIntyre sediment sampler.