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  • Outputs produced as part of the South Coast Regional Environmental Characterisation on behalf of the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund. Data available to download from www.marinealsf.org.uk/ Due to poor weather conditions, only this eastern area contains a full grid of multibeam echo sounder data. Therefore, for the confidence assessment, dataset was split in two. GB001090 contains the the lower confidence areas

  • Mapis based on the interpretation of various types of data from a number of surveys carried out between 2011-2012 both in the intertidal and subtidal zones. Additionally the seabed « Carte G » from the French hydrographic survey (SHOM) was used in the interpretation process. In the tidal zone the identification was made by interpreting coastal ortho-photographs from BD Ortho (2005 et 2009) and digitising them on scale 1 : 2000ème with further qualification of the polygons based on ground truth data. For the subtidal zone, several data sources from 2011 were available: bathymetric lidar (with sounding density about 1pt*3m-2), side scan sonar (resolution of about 0.2m), underwater video, sediment and fauna samples collected with grabs and trawls. Addtionnally a single beam sounder was running at all times during the transects, which contributing to improve the depth DTM. In the outer rocky circalittoral zone, side scan sonar corridors were surveyed with a coverage of 30-50% depending on places. In the offshore deep circalittoral zone (known as La Grande vasière) where soft sediment is predominant, side scan sonar coverage was reduced to about 5-10%. In these latter two circalittoral zones, interpolation between sonar corridors was supported by SHOM « Carte G » (approx. scale 1:100000) along with a 100m resolution depth DTM. On rocky seabed, exposure at the seabed was described using kinetic energy from a combination of wave and current hydrodynamic models according to the methods described in: http://doi.org/10.13155/49975. Rocky substrate in intertidal and infralittoral zones was derived from the combined interpretation of both the topographic and bathymetric Lidar DTMs and aerial photographs, where permitted by water transparency. Various representations of the DTMs (slope, hillshade) helped delineate rocky outcrops with good reliability. Biological qualification of the substrate polygons was made through taxonomic analysis of benthos samples collected by MNHN in the framework of the project"Ecological assessment of Natura 2000 site - Roches de Penmarc’h".The final habitat classification was a synthesis of the main habitat classifications, namely: Generic habitats from the Habitat Directive (EUR 27), Elementary habitats from the French Cahiers d’habitats, The Rebent classificationand EUNIS level 4 as much as possible.

  • Map derived from the work presented by F.Tempera and coleagues on the Condor seamount, near Faial Island in the Azores. High-resolution datasets collected by multibeam and acoustic backscatter surveys were used to produce fine-scale seafloor nature and morpho-tectonic interpretations of the seamount, collected from various acoustic surveys from 2008 to 2010. submitted in Fernando Tempera, Ana Hipólito, José Madeira, Sara Vieira, Aldino S. Campos, Neil C. Mitchell, Condor seamount (Azores, NE Atlantic): A morpho-tectonic interpretation, Deep-Sea Research II, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j. dsr2.2013.09.016

  • This map was produced as part of the site selection process for the Greater Thames Estuary AoS. It aimed to characterise the habitat features of the AoS, and to identify the areas of Annex I habitat present.

  • Flores rock substrate from seismic subbottom profiles interpretation. (Bates, C.R., 2005. Sub-Bottom Profiling for Sand Resource Assessment, Flores Island, Azores. Team Internal Report 05-04)

  • This dataset is an output of the “Mediterranean Sensitive Habitats” project (MEDISEH). It shows under a raster form modelled spatial distributions of Posidonia oceanica across the Mediterranean Sea. Posidonia oceanica is endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, where it is the dominant seagrass, covering about 50,000 km2 of coastal to offshore sandy and rocky areas down to depths of about 45 m. P. oceanica is a protected species according to EU legislation (Habitat directive), the Bern and Barcelona Conventions and several national legislations. While its distribution is well documented along the European shores of the western Mediterranean Sea, limited information is available about the southern shore and the eastern Mediterranean Sea. In order to bridge this information gap, one of the goals of Task 1.3 of the MEDISEH project was to model P. oceanica distribution across the whole Mediterranean basin. A Random Forest (i.e. a Machine Learning technique) was “trained” on data from regions where information was available and then used to predict the probability of occurrence of P. oceanica where needed. The raster has a spatial resolution of 0.004166 decimal degrees, and the values are in the [0,1] interval (occurrence probabilities).

  • Broadscale habitat (EUNIS level 3) for the Cromer Shoals Chalk Beds recommended Marine Conservation Zone (rMCZ).Seabed texture polygons mapped using semi automated ISO cluster unsupervised classification and expert interpretation of acoustic data (MBES bathymetry and backscatter) and groundtruthing data from PSA analysis and image (stills and video) classification.

  • Outputs produced as part of the South Coast Regional Environmental Characterisation on behalf of the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund. Data available to download from www.marinealsf.org.uk/ Due to poor weather conditions, only the eastern part of the study area was contains a full grid of multibeam echo sounder data. Therefore, for the confidence assessment, dataset was split in two. GB001089 contains the the higher confidence areas

  • This map covers both the intertidal zone and subtidal zones of the study sites. It is made from high resolution remote sensing data - both acoustic and optical - from various surveys carried out over the period 2008 to 2013 of various types: (i) multibeam echosounder (MBES), side scan sonar (SSS), RoxAnn acoustic ground discrimination system (AGDS), (ii) ortho-photography (the “Ortholittorale survey” from 2000), (iii) topographic and bathymetric lidar . It was complemented by (i) underwater video,(ii) sediment and biological grab samples, (iii) ground truth data from surveys in the tidal and infralittoral zone using GPS, annotations and photography.The habitat classification was a synthesis of the main habitat classifications, namely:Generic habitats from the Habitat Directive (EUR 27), Elementary habitats from the French Cahiers d’habitats, The Rebent classificationand EUNIS level 4 as much as possible. Map scale is in the range of 1:20000, with local improvements to 1:10000.

  • Outputs produced as part of the Outer Thames Estuary Regional Environmental Characterisation on behalf of the Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund. Data available to download from www.thamesrecgis.org.uk